The Ahmaud Arbery case underscores the historical role of black pastors


The Ahmaud Arbery case underscores the historical role of black pastors

Minutes after three men were found guilty of killing the jogger Ahmaud Arbery in Brunswick, Georgia, Rev. Al Sharpton led a large crowd to prayer outside the Glynn County Courthouse. People closed their eyes and bowed their heads at the same time when Sharpton said, “Let’s pray.”

That quiet moment outside the courthouse, the day before Thanksgiving, came two weeks after hundreds of black religious leaders from across the country gathered there to support Arbery’s family, despite defense attorney Kevin Gough, who represented one of the men in the February of Arbery stood before the court 2020 shoots the death. Responding to Sharpton being on trial with Arbery’s family, Gough told Judge Timothy Walmsley in early November that he “didn’t want any more black pastors” in the courtroom lest they intimidate the jury.

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